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    What You Need to Know About Smartphones, Teens and Depression

    Panicking About Your Kids’ Phones? New Research Says Don’t is the title of an article in the New York Times. 

    The writer says a growing number of academicians are challenging the true impact of social media and smartphones, questioning whether too much time on devices is actually the culprit for the dramatic increase in anxiety, depression and other mental health issues, especially in teens.

    Before you jump on that bandwagon, believing the claims, you might want to hear what psychologist Jean Twenge has to say. Twenge is a professor of psychology at San Diego State and author of numerous books including Generation Me and her most recent release, iGen: Why Kids are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood.

    In a blog for the Institute for Family Studies, Twenge calls out the NYT writer on six facts that, she claims, he ignores. 

    Twenge contends that the NYT article grossly misrepresents the research consensus on technology and mental health because the article makes it sound as if the majority of researchers have concluded that technology use isn’t related to mental health. Twenge says that is not the case. 

    “The article also misrepresents findings from a recent review of screen time and mental health studies,” writes Twenge. “The article does mention a recent review of studies on screen time and mental health by Amy Orben, who concluded that the average correlation between social media use and depressive symptoms is between .11 and .17.”

    The article cites this study as evidence that the link is small, but Twenge argues these are not small effects. Data from the CDC’s Youth Risk Survey of US High School students indicates that twice as many heavy users of electronic devices (5+ hours a day) compared to light users (1 hour a day) have attempted suicide (12% vs. 6%).

    Twenge states that the NYT article quotes experts who, without plausible evidence, dismiss the possibility that the rise of social media and smartphones might be behind the marked rise in teen depression, self-harm and suicide in recent years. The article quotes Jeff Hancock of the Stanford Social Media Lab as saying, “Why else might American kids be anxious other than telephones? How about climate change? How about income inequality? How about more student debt?”

    “The problem with this argument is that none of these factors can explain the increase in teen mental health issues that began in 2012,” Twenge writes. “First, they didn’t happen at the same time. The largest increases in income inequality occurred between 1980 and 2000… Student loan debt has been stable since 2012. The number of Americans worried a fair amount or a great deal about climate change went from 73% in 2012 to 74% in 2019.”

    Twenge contrasts this with 2013, the first year the majority of Americans owned a smartphone. By 2018, 95% of teens had access to a smartphone and 45% of them said they were online “almost constantly.”

    “The largest increase in self-harm, self-poisoning and suicide occurred among 10- to 14-year-old girls,” Twenge writes. “Hancock would have us believe that 10- to 14-year-olds are harming themselves because they are upset over income inequality or possibly someday having to pay off student loans after college - not because they are bullied online, not because they feel constant pressure to look perfect on social media, not because they can access online sites instructing them in self-harm, and not because electronic communication has replaced in-person interaction, a basic human need.”

    While Twenge does state that concern about climate change seems plausible, she asks, “How many 12-year-old-girls do you know who are cutting themselves because the planet is warming? It is much more likely they are concerned about self-image, social status, friendships and family relationships - all issues that have become fraught in the age of social media.” 

    Twenge also notes that the rise in depression, self-harm and suicide has been considerably larger among girls than boys. She contends that all of the issues listed above should impact boys and girls equally. Thus, they do not explain why the rise would be larger for girls.

    Technology use, however, does differ by gender. Girls spend more time on social media, which may be more toxic than the gaming which is more popular among boys.

    Twenge calls out the author for combining two completely separate questions - whether technology use is related to depression among individuals and whether the increase in smartphone and social media use is related to the generational increase in teen depression.

    “Even teens who don’t use technology have been affected by the shift in teen social life from in-person get-togethers to online interactions,” Twenge says. “Consider a teen who doesn’t use social media and would prefer to go out with her friend, but who will she go out with when everyone else is at home on Instagram?”

    The NYT article also points to Europe as proof that smartphones are not behind the increase in teen depression, yet the evidence shows otherwise. The study used to make the case examines adults, not teens. The World Health Organization reports increases in suicide rates around the world, with the largest increases among youth.

    The last point Twenge makes is that while the researchers claiming that technology use is unrelated to well-being said they had not taken any funding from the tech industry, one of them is currently employed and one was previously employed by the Oxford Internet Institute, which is funded by Facebook, Google and Microsoft. 

    “Parents can rest assured that their instincts to protect their kids from too much screen time are not wrong,” Twenge writes. “If kids who ate five apples a day versus one were twice as likely to attempt suicide, parents would make extremely sure their kids didn’t eat too many apples. Why should our response to technology time be any different?”

    The moral of this story is - don’t believe everything you read. Check the facts for yourself. What you don’t know can hurt you and the ones you love.

    This article was originally published in the Chattanooga Times Free Press on February 1, 2020.

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    How Technology Affects Families

    Do you remember when the only television at home was in the family room? Or when your family traveled in the car and everybody looked for license plates from all 50 states? Now, practically every vehicle has a DVD player and every home has several televisions. Technology is everywhere.

    In the last 50 years, technology has exploded. It is no longer in a fixed location with limited capability and parental supervision. It is literally unlimited and extremely difficult to regulate.

    At a conference on strengthening the family, author and clinical counselor, John Van Epp asked:

    • To what extent will families allow technology to be fused with their relationships?
    • Are families unplugging devices to really plug into each other?

    Based on several studies, it appears that families aren’t doing a great job of connecting.

    Consider these examples.

    A group from Boston Medical Center watched family interactions in fast-food restaurants, specifically looking at how caregivers engaged with children. Out of 55 families, 40 parents were doing something with their phone. The researchers refer to this as “absorption with the mobile device.” When a child started prompting a parent for attention, the child got in trouble for interrupting the parent.

    UCLA anthropologist Elinor Ochs conducted an intensive in-home, four-year study of 32 families on this issue. Ochs found the primary theme in these homes was multi-tasking among family members. She cites an all-too-familiar conversation between parent and child: “My parents always tell me that I can’t do homework while listening to music, but they don’t understand that it helps me to concentrate.”

    Strengthening his case, Van Epp cited David Myers’ work as the director of the University of Michigan's Brain Cognition Lab. Myers is very clear that the brain does NOT multi-task. It may act in parallel functions (touch, sound, vision), but when engaging in distinctly different tasks, the brain operates like a toggle switch. It jumps from one thing to another. Myers debunks the myth that students are great multi-taskers, stating, "The bottom line is you CANNOT simultaneously be thinking about your tax return and reading an essay."

    “This constant multi-tasking that people are doing results in dopamine 'squirts.' These lead to an addiction to constant techno-activity,” Van Epp said. “Yet, studies show that downtime for the brain is essential to the development of identity, morals, empathy and creativity.”

    Van Epp issued a challenge: Lay your smart phone down. See if you can go for an hour without picking it up.

    “Research shows that technology is actually producing higher rates of anxiety among children and adults,” Van Epp said. “Apps are influencing child development and short-circuiting identity formation. They're also discouraging face to face interactions and creating superficial intimacy.”

    If you still aren’t convinced this is an issue, check out Outdoors and Out of Reach, Studying the Brain in the New York Times. And for good measure, watch Gary Turk’s Look Up video on YouTube. 

    “We must begin balancing technology and real time with loved ones,” Van Epp said. “We can’t let technology define us. Advances in technology can never replace gains in family interactions.”

    So, what about you? Will your family unplug devices in order to really plug into each other?


    Looking for more? Check out this episode of JulieB TV for an in-depth look on this topic!