Articles for Parents

Everything listed under: cyberbullying

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    The Truth About Cyberbullying

    True or False?

    • Cyberbullying victims are at increased risk for traditional bullying victimization, substance use and school problems.

    • Victims of cyberbullying suffer from anger, frustration and sadness.

    • Most victims of cyberbullying tell an adult about their experience.

    • Victims report that they are primarily cyberbullied by strangers.

    If you answered “true” for the first two statements and “false” for the last two, you are correct.

    News stories abound about young people and bullying. One of the most widely-known incidents is about Megan Meier, a then 13-year-old from Missouri. She became online friends with a person she thought was a new boy in town. The “friend” was actually a group of young people and adults who plotted to humiliate Megan because of a broken friendship with another girl. When Megan discovered the truth, she became distraught and later committed suicide.

    Cyberbullying is defined as using the computer or other electronic devices to intimidate, threaten or humiliate another. It most commonly takes place on the Internet among students from a given school or neighborhood.

    Researchers and co-directors of the Cyberbullying Research Center, Justin Patchin and Sameer Hinduja, collected data from more than 15,000 youth regarding their personal cyberbullying experiences. They found that:

    • Five percent of the youth they interviewed claimed to be scared for their own safety.

    • On average, 25 percent of youth have been a victim of cyberbullying.

    • Among this percentage, mean or hurtful comments, and spreading rumors were the most common forms of cyberbullying.

    • More than half of study participants feel that cyberbullying is as bad as, or worse than bullying in real life.

    • 41 percent of victims do not tell anyone in their off-screen lives about their abuse, but 38 percent told an online friend.

    • 16 percent admitted to bullying another individual online.

    • Most of the bullying offenders said they consider bullying to be fun or instructive; such as a way to strengthen their victims.

    Your child uses cell phones, emails, instant messaging, websites, blogs, text messages and other methods to communicate electronically. All of them present a potential cyberbullying risk to your child.

    What Do Parents Need to Know?

    The impact of cyberbullying can be devastating. Cyber victimization can cause poor grades, emotional spirals, poor self-esteem, repeated school absences, depression and in some cases, suicide. These outcomes are similar to those of real-life bullying, except with cyberbullying there is often no escape.

    Young people used to be able to avoid the “bully” once school was out. Today's technology now makes it almost impossible to escape. Since few parents closely monitor their child’s digital use, it is far easier for bullies to get away with bullying online than in person. And as the quiz pointed out, kids rarely tell their parents about the bullying.

    What Can Parents Do?

    • Establish that all rules for interacting appropriately with people in real life apply online.

    • Explain what cyberbullying is and why it is unacceptable to bully or to allow bullying to continue.

    • Talk with your teen about the nature of REAL friendships.

    • Encourage your child to talk with you any time they believe they or someone they know is dealing with a bully.

    • Model appropriate technology use.

    • Write a technology contract that includes any form of technology used in your home.

    Cyberbullying can be a serious threat to the well-being of your child, but the best plan of attack is to be proactive. Being ignorant about technology in this day and age won’t cut it, so you'll want to educate yourself as well as your children. As the saying goes, information is power.

    For tips on parenting get our E-book "How to be a Guide for your Teen" Download Here

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    What You Need to Know About Bullying

    In 2012, social media erupted over the email sent to news anchor Jennifer Livingston about being overweight. The email's sender contended that he was trying to bring to her attention that she was not a good role model for young girls in their community because she was overweight. Her on-air response to his email created quite a buzz.

    Someone also bullied a young girl named Kaelynn. She tells of physical and sexual abuse and about the death of her mother. Suffering from PTSD, she began stuttering. Classmates called her meth-head, orphan, worthless, a mistake, faker, retard.

    “I was hated for being myself and I began to hate myself,” she said. None of Kaelynn’s classmates had any idea what she had experienced. She attempted suicide in fifth grade. Fortunately, her attempt failed and today, she speaks out against bullies.

    While October is Bully Prevention Month, this topic is worthy of ongoing discussion. Bullying is nothing new, but it seems to exist at a whole new level.

    Has our culture become a place where anything goes? The mean acts aren't only happening with young people; adults participate as well. What became of human decency and treating each other with respect, even when we disagree?

    Webster’s Dictionary defines a bully as someone who is quarrelsome and overbearing; one who habitually badgers and intimidates.

    Could your child be the bully? Is your child a victim? And, how would you know?

    If you don't talk with your children about bullying, now is a good time to start. Here are some questions to get things going.

    • Is conflict different than bullying? All relationships have conflict. Just because someone doesn’t share your opinion about something or agree with your perspective does not mean they are a bully. Bullying is when a person treats you disrespectfully, is mean to you over and over again, or intentionally seeks to embarrass or harass you because you have a different viewpoint.

    • What do you do if you see someone being bullied? Don’t assume that your child will automatically stand up for the victim. Talk with them about how they would handle this situation. The research shows that if just one person stands up for the person being bullied it can change the entire situation, BUT it is hard even for adults to step out and go against the crowd. If it doesn’t feel safe to say something, go get help.

    • If someone bullies you, what will you do? Parents assume that their child will say something, but studies show that is not the case. Most bullying victims do not tell their parents because they are afraid the situation will worsen. Talk through the steps your child can take if they believe they are being bullied. Assure them that they can come to you for help in working through the situation.

    A parent’s job is to pay attention. So, keep the lines of communication open by talking often and honestly about this topic. That way, your child is ready if something happens.

    Here's a guide to help you understand, prevent and counteract bullying: Guide to Bullying and Cyberbullying *provided by OnlineSchools.org

    For tips on parenting get our E-book "How to be a Guide for your Teen" Download Here