Parenting

Spring Break Safety Tips

It is hard to believe spring break season is upon us. And if you have teens or college-age young adults, you’ve probably had ongoing conversations about how they’ll spend their break.

As kids try to get permission (and money!) for the trip, you’ll hear phrases like these. “I’m almost an adult. This is a rite of passage.” Or, “It’s what college students do. We go to the beach and hang out.”

The pressure is on for sure.

But before you give in to that pressure, here is what research shows about spring break students:

This has become a major issue on some Florida beaches. So much so, that places like Gulf Shores and Orange Beach police departments have taken precautionary measures to avoid problems. These cities have already posted open letters on Facebook to those planning to spend spring break there.

“We have said it before, but just so we are clear,” says one of the letters, “If your top priorities when visiting the beach are being drunk and disorderly; breaking what you consider to be small rules like underage drinking, littering and leaving glass on the beach, urinating in public, using drugs, or engaging in violent or indecent behavior, Gulf Shores is definitely not the place for you.”

Before you assume this is not an issue with your child, it’s helpful to remember that risk-taking peaks during adolescence. Instead of weighing risks based on logic and wisdom, teens are usually more concerned about how their choices will impact their peer relationships. They see being unaccepted relationally as a threat.

Scientists found that while a teen might make good choices when he is alone, adding friends to the mix changes things. It makes him more likely to take risks for the reward of relationship instead of considering the cost. Even if your teen generally makes great decisions, getting together with hundreds of other spring breakers can make it seem like the rewards of risk-taking outweigh any future consequences.

If your goal is for your spring breaker to be safe, here are a few things to consider:

Ultimately, the goal is to keep your child, and those around your child, safe over spring break. We all know that one irresponsible decision or crazy social post can change the trajectory of a young person’s life.

Most of us would probably agree about one thing. It’s better to leave no stone unturned than to wish we had said something. Don’t be afraid to be “that parent.” You know, the one who encourages new experiences, knowing that a strong foundation can help them make the most of their opportunities.

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