Parenting

ScreamFree Parenting

Hal Runkel and his family went to the Waffle House for breakfast one Saturday morning.  Upon arrival they were given coloring books and paper hats just like the cook wears.

“Shortly after ordering, Brandon, our 2-year-old became restless,” says Runkel, marriage and family therapist and author of ScreamFree Parenting.  “Nothing made him happy.  The waitress brought him a waffle which ended up on the guy’s leg who was sitting at the next table.  At that point I picked Brandon up to go outside and in the process hit the same guy in the head with Brandon’s leg.  By this time everybody in the restaurant was watching.  As I went out the door, it slammed behind me shaking the glass.

“I stood outside shaking my fist and yelling at my son.  When we came back inside I sat down and looked across the table at my wife who was trying to contain the smirk on her face.  At that moment I realized I still had the Waffle House hat on my head.  Clearly I looked pretty silly, but the truth is I didn’t need that hat to make me look foolish.”

Runkel contends that in many instances it isn’t the children acting foolish; it is the parents.

Becoming a ScreamFree parent isn’t about becoming a perfect parent with the perfect techniques to raising perfect kids.  You don’t have to have all the right answers at all the right times in order to be the parent you have always wanted to be – you just have to learn to calm down.

“I am convinced that good parenting is about parents learning how to take back their own emotional remote control,” Runkel says.  “Parents have to make sure they are being the grown up in every situation…no matter what the children do.

“When a parent is screaming what they are really saying is, ‘Calm me down, I can’t handle what you are doing right now.’  At that moment the parent has lost control and handed the emotional remote control to the least mature person in the household.”

According to Runkel, when parents focus on calming their own emotional reactivity, they begin to make parenting decisions out of their highest principles instead of reacting out of their deepest fears.

There are six keys to being a ScreamFree parent:

“What every child wants are parents who can keep their cool, even when things get heated,” Runkel says.  “Children want parents who are less anxious and prone to knee-jerk reactions and far more level-headed.  Your children want you to remain unflappable, even when they flip out.  Most parents’ biggest struggle is dealing with their own emotional reactivity.  That is why the greatest thing we can do for our children is learn to focus on us, not them.”

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